Birds of Different Feathers

Birds The class participates in tolerance activities to prompt discussions about 'different and alike.' Then they create their own birds of different feathers using oil pastels and construction paper. Students include a message which their birds are carrying to the world.

Objectives and assessment criteria

Students will:
  • participate in a tolerance activity and then discuss how it relates to them.
  • analyze the saying "Birds of a feather flock together" by comparing it to a teaching tolerance poster.
  • recognize the need for tolerance towards other people and appreciate their differences.
  • design a bird of their own, making choices about color, shape and embellishment.
  • write a tolerance message for the bird to carry in its beak.

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 Box Design

Box Students learn about careers in art and the design and color choices they must make as they construct custom boxes with lids. These boxes can be used as containers for gifts.


 
 
 
Objectives and assessment criteria

Students will:
  • learn that box design is an art career in graphic design and advertising.
  • make color scheme and line design choices for a box decoration.
  • accurately use fractions and a ruler to make the box bottom smaller than the lid.
  • demonstrate good craftsmanship in measuring, folding, and constructing a box.
  • space

  • space

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 Creative Character Sculptures

Character Students collaboratively think of a character, either animal, human or make believe, that they would like in a story. Working with a partner, they creatively solve problems to make their character from "found" materials. Construction and embellishment make the characters come alive.

Objectives and assessment criteria

Students will:
  • look, observe and discuss the sculptures that Picasso made from found objects.
  • create a collaborative sculpture character that will stand and have necessary body parts.
  • solve building problems as the sculpture develops.
  • decorate or embellish the character with pattern and texture using many materials.
 
 
 
 
 
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Grids and Values in Art and Math

Grids Students are introduced to the illusionary art of M. C. Escher. They use hard and soft lead pencils to shade a five-step value scale and then use contrasting values and a dot grid to make isometric drawings of cubes. Grids are used in the second session to make a cooperative enlargement of an Escher print.

Objectives and assessment criteria

Students will:
  • make a value scale with pencil shading and apply this information to the isometric cube drawings. The same value shading will be used in the class cooperative enlargement of an M. C. Escher print.
  • use an isometric dot grid to draw a cube design with three shaded values.
  • use estimation with a line grid to enlarge and shade a small part of a M. C. Escher print.
  • collaborate with other students so the objects connect with the adjacent piece of the grid.

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 Horse Studies

Horse Students learn about Renaissance man Leonardo da Vinci, and his desire to cast a 24 foot tall horse from metal. They are also introduced to the work of contemporary sculptor Deborah Butterfield, who makes life-size horses out of various materials. Students practice drawing horses, add rubbed textures, and use the drawings to assemble collages.

Objectives and assessment criteria

Students will:
  • learn about Leonardo da Vinci's great horse sculpture and how his ideas survived in his journals.
  • compare the horse sculpture styles of Deborah Butterfield and Leonardo da Vinci.
  • look at the bone and muscle structure of a horse to understand how to draw it.
  • use shapes and lines to draw a horse.
  • use measurements of radius and diameter for drawing horse proportions.
  • rub neutral colors over texture plates to add texture to the horse.
  • cut out horse drawings and assemble a collage.

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Mt. McKinley: Sydney Laurence

Mountain Students look at the many paintings of Sydney Laurence, a renowned painter of Mt. McKinley. Watercolor pencil painting techniques are used as students learn about contour lines, value, shading and the importance of contrast to create their versions of the mountain.

 
 
Objectives and assessment criteria

Students will:
  • look at the Mt. McKinley paintings by Sydney Laurence and find the foreground, middle ground and background.
  • use a contour line to draw McKinley and other parts of the landscape.
  • shade their drawings with watercolor pencils using more than one color to create contrast.
  • paint one section at a time using careful brush strokes to turn the watercolor pencil lines into paint.


 

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